“I haven’t had an alternative in the choice of my profession, since I have grown up in a family of doctors and haven't imagined myself in any other profession. I have interacted with patients since childhood; my days have passed in different hospitals. My father was a surgeon, my mother – a specialist of blood. I have been present at surgeries since 4. After the graduation I have worked in Charentsavan as a therapist, then as a neurologist at the 5th polyclinic in Yerevan. 

The Reality of Heroes

The wounded heroes live in a different reality. A special department at the Mikaelyan Institute of Surgery reflects that reality. The long corridor leads you to the patient and therapy rooms on both sides where the wounded soldiers are still in hospital bed but with their lives being changed every single day due to the consecutive physical and mental treatment - therapies, exercises, massages, and meeting-discussions. Their means of struggle is silence, while their stories are heartbreaking and worth of true admiration...

Brief Encounters

6 regions, 52 schools, 5000 students, 71 teachers. This is the statistics of the program “Teach for Armenia”. Every time a first encounter - villages with smoke from the chimneys, mud, moisture,  uncompromising school bell, shaking hands, a coffee table, window panes deprived of paint, equally spread dung. 

The Veterans of the Theater

The Marionette State Theater - founded in 1987- is operating more than thirty years now. Our theater is a family, we know the difficulties of one another, we are next to each other. It’s not us that are good or bad, it’s the smallness of the theater. It is a place where people do not demand things which are not possible to fulfil. People just love each other, spend time together.

Letter to Prime Minister

Lyuba (Talita) is one of those women, whom I meet constantly. She works as a cleaner in Abovyan city. One can see her often cleaning our own yard. She is a mother of four. After losing the house of her husband Lyuba has lived in numerous places. The most outstanding of which, where I got acquainted with her and her family, was the “stone house” in an uninhabited field out of Abovyan city.

On the Seashore of Armenia

Let’s define a country: post-Soviet – which Armenia is; post war - like the one in Nagorno Karabakh that remains unresolved up to now; post traumatic - as after the 1915 Armenian Genocide. Developing. Provincial. In transition. Eastern. European. Small. Riddled with corruption. In love. Sad. Having fun. In a relationship with photography.

Other Motherland

Alvin’s mother Lamaghana lives in Armenia for 8 years now. She has come to Armenia at 21 from Guinea. She confesses she cannot retell the whole story as why and how she has reached Armenia, because it’s too heavy for her. She describes it in Armenian with difficulty. “I have come to Armenia because of the conflict.

DOMIK

In December 1988, the devastating "Spitak Earthquake" hit the Northern part of Armenia where it killed at least 25.000 people and left half a million homeless. Particularly in Armenia's second largest city Gyumri, the number of victims is estimated to be around 15.000-17.000.

War Not Peace: Unpunctuated Lives

The Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is the longest war in the South Caucasus, with alternating phases of relative peace and escalation, including not only the Artsakh–Azerbaijan border, but also the administrative district of the Republic of Armenia.

Khtsaberd, Artsakh

There’s a place in the world I dream about every morning, where every evening I regret not being there. There’s a place in the world where, as my seven-year-old daughter says, mommy’s grandma, who is quite old, lives. In that center of the world, the houses are so old and have suffered so many injuries from the war that they collapse into themselves, hunched, their shoulders touching the ground, and die.

They leave today

The members of the house have been silent since morning. No one is saying anything specific. It’s as though they’re all offended with each other; they don’t look in each other in the eye. The mother silently packs the suitcase. Only the twelve-year-old son can’t contain himself; he is constantly upset and gets everyone emotional. And again each one is in his own thoughts, asking himself, How did the moment to leave the country, the house arrive? The moment to get a visa and decide to seek asylum at some camp in some country? Because you have a child with a disability, and this is the only way out?